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mooc-best-practices [2017/04/18 12:47]
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-====== Where to Start ====== 
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-Never created a MOOC before? ​ [[adapting_an_existing_on-campus_course_for_berkeleyx|Start here.]] 
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-====== Discussion Forums ====== 
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-**Managing forums:​** ​ Supervision of the forums is a must, as minor problems can quickly escalate if left unsupervised. ​ 
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-**First week or two:​** ​ Ani Adhikari'​s advice is to be proactive during first couple of weeks in identifying major threads/​problems on the forums and systematically addressing - for example, you could do a general post stating which questions you intend to address. ​ Ani found that once students realize someone is listening, the forums quiet down and the posts are about the material. 
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-**Anonymous posting:​** ​ We suggest you disable anonymous posting in the forums. ​ Others have found that anonymity can create a toxic atmosphere in which a few trolls/​griefers can post without accountability. 
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-**Trolls and griefers:​** ​ There will be some even if non-anonymous. ​ Don't get drawn in to such discussions. ​ Clamp down on uncivil behavior; the course has UC Berkeley'​s name on it, so apply the standards you'd apply in your classroom discussions. ​ You can ban problem students permanently if they cannot be managed. 
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-  * The first time around you will need one or more Berkeley students to monitor the forums. ​ Remember MOOC students span all timezones so checks need to be more than once a day. 
-  * At the end of your first successful MOOC offering, consider emailing all the enrolled students (this is a function within Studio) and solicit volunteers to be Community TA's the next time around, with a part-time (8-10 hours/week) Berkeley undergraduate who has done well in the course to supervise and coordinate the Community TA's so there is somewhat even coverage. 
-  * Here are some great [[https://​docs.google.com/​document/​d/​10cF3D_fExiCkmI4NJ8TLnaUFMrTx5Mz-HHm_MD3-erU/​edit| tips for forum moderators]],​ including Community TA's. 
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-**Integrating Piazza:​** ​ If using edX materials as a SPOC for a Berkeley course, many Berkeley courses have "​standardized"​ on the Piazza forums. ​ Here are instructions for having Piazza integrated into the edX course, rather than the default edX forums: 
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-(Instructions coming soon) 
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-====== Video lectures ====== 
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-**Keep them short:​** ​ edX data suggests that the median student watches 6 minutes of video before taking some action like fast-forward or abandonment. ​ Keep individual segments short, and provide plenty of opportunities in between segments for students to interact with the material in other ways (questions, quizzes, visualizations,​ etc.) 
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-====== Courseware ====== 
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-**Courseware:​** ​ Students will have a wide range of system types and capabilities,​ especially in developing world, so you can't expect a minimum standard computer configuration. ​ Software installation is painful in the best cases, so: 
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-  * Make courseware available as a service accessible via a Web browser, if you can. 
-  * If not, create a virtual machine (VM) image that students can either deploy on their own computer using a free hypervisor like [[http://​virtualbox.org|VirtualBox]],​ or can deploy in Amazon'​s EC2 cloud. ​ (For the latter, they'​ll either need to pay for cycles or use the free "​micro"​ tier, which is VERY underpowered for anything more compute-bound than compiling and running very simple programs.) ​ The MOOCLab can point you to technical help for this. 
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-====== Handouts/​course material ====== 
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-Although you can upload most files directly into Studio, and you can create '​static'​ HTML pages and even online textbooks in Studio, you may choose to also distribute course materials through other sites such as Google Docs for reasons of your own.  If so, keep in mind: 
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-** Copyright:​** ​ In general you cannot distribute materials on which you don't own the copyright without getting specific permission from the copyright holder. ​ While there are fair-use exemptions when distributing certain materials in campus classes, **these exemptions often do not apply for MOOCs** or for distributing materials outside of your brick-and-mortar classroom, and proceeding without permissions puts you and the University at legal risk..See [[copyright|Copyright and Trademark Issues]] for help and consultations. 
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-**Redundancy:​** ​ If you use external sites such as Google Docs for handouts, consider also putting them on a second site (eg Dropbox), not just due to possible site failures (rare) but because network paths to different services may be dramatically different in different countries. ​ Other examples: YouTube, back up with Vimeo; Github gists, back up with Pastebin; Google Docs, backup with Dropbox; etc. 
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-**Distribution:​** Once a Google Doc is out there, it's out there forever. ​ If you try to remove access from it, future students will send you '​share'​ requests. ​ There'​s a particular risk if the document is a homework assignment that is subsequently revised: eager students may stumble across the old document and try to do the old assignment. ​ So be sure to delete or make private any such documents when the course ends. 
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-====== Others'​ best practices ====== 
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-  * This [[http://​ed-blog.10gen.com/​ |blog]] by 10gen, a technology company with whom EdX partners, gives their best practices for creating internal MOOCs for their employees.